Tag Archives: ideas

Order

Everything must be in its right place.

Objects as well as feelings, each entity should be where they belong.

With the help of brilliantly insightful Miranda July, I will give it a try.

Importance should be given only to things that matter.

Political Seeds

It is not often that artists successfully navigate their way through political themes.

PJ Harvey does it so gracefully I thought it was but pertinent to include her in my wave of politics-related posts. Here’s the most recent video for her much acclaimed new album Let England Shake, The Glorious Land:

As the lyrics state, we must be keenly aware of the people we choose to govern us and their political agenda.

How is our glorious land sewn? Not with wheat and corn

War is the silliest excuse for the enforcement of economical and political interests.

Let us not be led to believe otherwise.

Role model

When I was writing yesterday’s post about Brazilian models of Italian or German background, I also had in mind to write a different chapter of my male beauty book showing black guys too.

What a hard task.

First of all, I couldn’t remember the name of any off the top of my head. That was a little surprising. Then, I started searching for it in various places and it is just unbelievably hard to find any representative name.

Finally, I ended up coming across a discussion on how Eurocentric the fashion industry is, and that not even initiatives like Vogue’s Black Issue suffice for changing people’s minds. I had to convince myself that the discussion was more fruitful than just posting an image.

Although there are parts of Brazil where it is very rare to see black people (namely the South of the country), this is not what I and most people who grow up in the enormously populated and multiracial states of Rio, São Paulo or Minas Gerais are used to.

As always, I turn to music in the hopes of helping building a better world:

Grace Jones is unparalleled both as a fashion icon and as an artist.

Draw your own conclusions.

Mourning heterosexuality

I was reading excerpts of a book written by Mexican psychotherapist Marina Castañeda on homosexuality a while ago and I couldn’t help but find it very insightful. Although I do not necessarily agree with her in some of the aspects she mentions, I did find one bit very interesting.

She claims that in the process of coming out every homosexual has to go through a mourning phase if they want to be happy as gay individuals later in life. That is, they have to mourn their supposed heterosexuality.

Growing up in societies which are governed by two-gender conceptions of living, including family and work-related assumptions, homosexuals have to learn how to let go of these ideas so deeply rooted in their consciousness in order to be able to accept the fact that they are unlike most others.

According to the author, it is the very process of learning how to give up such expectations which allows gay people to be more or less happy with their affections and sexuality with regards to society. Some do it and are able to find their place in the world, while others seem never to be willing to establish themselves as different from what is expected of them, and that is the major source of feelings of distress and unadaptability.

What a very interesting way of seeing these matters.

I’ve believed for some time now that being different is the key to creating. Once there is nothing to compare yourself to, you are forced to generate new models and just find a whole new path for yourself. And isn’t that what guides true artists and explorers into the unknown?

The thing is, this is by no means an easy task.

Adept at adapting

A friend of mine is returning to Brazil after yet another attempt of happiness abroad. This time it was Australia. Before it was France and years ago it had been Québec, in Canada.

She is just convinced she’ll never be happy here and is always on the look for new opportunities to escape. Then, after some time, she just dislikes everything about the foreign country where she is and decides to return. A short time afterwards, the cycle begins again.

Having lived abroad on several occasions myself, I have learned to detach (or at least try to) enjoyment from the place I happen to be in. No site can be an infinite foundation for fun if one is not ready for feeling free to embrace a different perspective on living.

Detaching oneself from one’s culture is a much harder endeavor, nonetheless. But I guess that if you know how to recognize the behavior and sociability patterns, adapting becomes much less challenging. But again, you may never adapt. And that can be okay too.

Immigrant Icon in a pic on Dazed (pic by Rankin)

M.I.A. is there to prove it. I have always loved her take on being who she is exactly because she is an immigrant in the UK and never feeling a full Brit (whatever that means) has contributed to building her persona as much as her own personality.

Her new album is out now and, apart from the controversy, it is plain brilliant. More on that later.

Elementary magnetism

Naïve are those who think their lives are not inextricably connected to the place they come from. Whether you love it, hate it or simply feel a part of it, the region where you grow up will always influence you, even when you don’t expect it to.

It wasn’t without wonder that I discovered how much I need mountains to feel at home in a city. Flat lands can be fun, fabulous or even fantastic, but they’ll always feel foreign to me.

In a place where mountains mean mines, I also feel a strange connection to everything metal, especially iron. It is quite weird, but I do tend to like art that manifests itself through the means of metal.

When I first saw Lézart, a sculpture piece by Brazilian contemporary artist Tunga, I immediately felt connected to it:

Lézart, 1989

Using magnets, iron and copper, this piece creates a wonderful illusion of gigantic combs with metal hair hanging from them. It is like the crude value of the material can only be refined into beauty by the hands and hair of humans.

The tittle, Lézart (‘lizard’ in French) makes me think of how nature can still crawl onto us, reminding us of where we came from and the fact that there is no escape from that. It is as if we our origins are sticky or magnetic.

As for my interpretations, they are a clear proof that places of emotion can affect one’s judgement. I almost feel a poem coming.

Well, false alarm.

Learn from examples

Isn’t it great when city authorities decide to make life more agreeable for its citizens?

Although very few of the Brazilian ones are taking any kind of initiative in that respect, progress can be seen here and there. Still, it is nothing as grand as what was done in Seoul, South Korea, with regards to the Cheonggyecheon river.

After years locked up inside a tomb of concrete, the stream was quite recently set free and transformed into a lovely green space and recreation area in the middle of the city.

This idea is so worthy of praise I am not sure I have to words to describe my admiration.

What strikes me the most is the way the riverbanks were given life when vegetation was (apparently) let grow in its own way.

It is high time people try to interfere with nature’s course just because we live in big cities. As the volcano in Iceland has yet again shown, we are completely at the mercy of the planet’s natural forces.

Maybe we should start from there.